I often struggle with identifying myself as a dietitian because the of the word “diet.” The word “diet” in general just refers to the types of foods you eat. For example, my diet today consists of fruits, vegetables breads, nuts, grains, coffee and water. However, in our culture, that is not how the word is used.

The word diet in our culture refers to something that you do in order to lose weight. So, when I say I am a dietitian, I have a problem because I am against diets and I am against dieting. The word diet and “dieting” persist in our country like cockroaches – they never go away. As soon as one diet dies another appears in its place. And on and on. Meanwhile, the majority of experts in the field, (“dietitians”), including myself, are against dieting because dieting does not work.

But instead of saying what I am against, and why I am against it, I would like to focus on what I am for.  These are the principles of the anti-diet.

Enjoy what you eat. First and foremost, like (even love) what you are eating.

Honor your body. Eat when you are hungry. Stop when you are full. Your body knows how much it needs to eat. Your job is to listen to your body.

Be mindful.  If you want something, eat it. Just be mindful while you are doing it. Be mindful of all the foods that you eat, of where your food comes from, of the impact that it has on your environment and the impact that it has on your body. When you become aware of these effects, without judgment, just mindfulness, you can truly look at your diet. You can see the foods that you are eating for what they are, you can stop eating the foods that don’t make you feel good, and eat more of the foods that do.

If you have confusion about any of this, send me a message. I am here to help. That’s my job as a dietitian and that is what I love about being a dietitian – helping people fall in love with what they are eating.

I've always loved eating @mitchinthekitchen you may see this at graduation

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